Friday Link Pack — July 1, 2016

Friday Link Pack — July 1, 2016


Image Credit: The Monacelli Press

The Creative Architect

Caught a lecture last week at the Mechanics Institute by my friend, author-architect Pierluigi Serraino, where he introduced his new book, “The Creative Architect:  Inside the Great Midcentury Personality Study.”  Just for fun, Pierluigi had been sifting through UC Berkeley architectural archives, and amongst a lot of material that was culled to be thrown away, he found long-forgotten documentation of a personality study done by the psychology department at UC Berkeley in 1958.  Meant to be an evaluation of the personality traits of highly creative minds, architects who participated included included Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Philip Johnson, and Louis Kahn. This is juicy stuff.
— Lynn Soleski


Image Credit: Christo and Jeanne-Claude

Christo & Jeanne-Claude do it Again with The Floating Piers in Lake Iseo, Italy

How cool is this? I also loved the Running Fence in the 70’s in Bodega Bay. I wish we could see more stuff like this in the US.
Daniel Johnson


Image Credit: brooklynbridgepark instagram

NYC Infrastructure is on Display – You just have to Look a Little Closer

If you’re not following Brooklyn Bridge Park on Instagram, you’re missing NYC gems like this.
John McGill

Sorry, Pantone 448C. The vote from Australian Smokers is in. 

“Respondents associated the colour with ‘dirty,’ ‘death,’ and ‘tar.’”
Gabriella Medina

Image Credit: Cornelia Konrads

Art Monday

Every Monday we try to start the week off right by sharing our favorite artists. As a design first studio, it’s a great way to stay tapped into what’s happening in the art world and spark conversations about overlapping themes in art and architecture.

This week's artist is a recommendation from Daniel Johnson. German artist Cornelia Konrads' work spans site-specific installations indoors and out as well as sculptural objects like her "books." Often stunning and gravity defying, all of her pieces have a little smirk lurking beneath the surface (and sometimes on full display).
Sam Moeller